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RDP into server in VPN with Apple computer

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Just browsing

RDP into server in VPN with Apple computer

I'm not very skilled on apple, but I need to perform a Remote Desktop into my vpn network. How do you configure the app on an iMac

4 REPLIES 4
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Kind of a big deal

Re: RDP into server in VPN with Apple computer

Follow the instructions here for MacOS. 

 

You may need to reorder the network adapters in order to force data across the client VPN. Here's what I do:

 

After the VPN connection is created, change the priority order for the connections:

  1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences and click Network.
  2. Choose Set Service Order from the Action pop-up menu (looks like a gear).
  3. Drag your VPN connection to the top of the list.
  4. Click OK, and then click Apply to make the new settings active.
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A model citizen

Re: RDP into server in VPN with Apple computer

A better option, following the advice of @Nash, would be to make a dedicated location so that you don't have to fiddle around with changing service orders based on what networking you are doing.

 

  1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences > Network
  2. Click on the Location drop down menu
  3. Choose Edit Locations…
  4. Click on the plus icon, name the location say RDP over VPN
  5. Choose Set Service Order from the Action pop-up menu
  6. Drag your VPN connection to the top of the list 
  7. Click OK, and then click Apply to make the new settings active
  8. Now you can switch-a-roo via the Apple Menu > Location 
  9. Profit
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Kind of a big deal

Re: RDP into server in VPN with Apple computer

Thanks for the improvement, @Richard_W. I'll add it to my list. I'm admittedly going off what our Mac person said over on end user computing, so uh... yeah.

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A model citizen

Re: RDP into server in VPN with Apple computer

Another top tip for locations:

 

You can set up locations based on network requirements, say for example you can have an Ethernet only network location by removing all other network interfaces by judicious use of the minus button.

 

Another good use of the locations is to check to see if networking issues can be troubleshot down to an interface. Say a client can't connect wirelessly:

Make a test location, do the Apply and see if this resolves.

If it does all you have to do, in the original location, is remove and re-add the errant interface (in this case the Wi-Fi, with - followed by an +) and don't forget the Apply.

 

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