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Product selection question

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Product selection question

Hi all, I have a consumer-environment question here...I have ISP service in my home from two providers. What is the best Meraki product to use to establish a load-balancing/failover configuration across these two services?  I have an Orbi setup (i know, blasphemy)  to distribute WiFi around the house, so I’d be connecting that in...

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Re: Product selection question

Hey @ToddATX. All the MX appliances are capable of load balancing across two internet feeds, so I would look at those. For home an MX64 is probably your best bet price wise, but maybe an MX84 if you need higher throughput. 

 

Unfortunately, if you have higher capacity Internet services the price of the corresponding MX is going to very quickly outpace the value you will get out of it. For example, I have a 1gig coax service at home, which would require an MX100 to properly use all the bandwidth. However, there's exactly zero chance that me and my wife could ever possible use 1gbps so I instead have an MX64 as that's much more in line with what we would actually use. 

 

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Kind of a big deal

Re: Product selection question

Hey @ToddATX. All the MX appliances are capable of load balancing across two internet feeds, so I would look at those. For home an MX64 is probably your best bet price wise, but maybe an MX84 if you need higher throughput. 

 

Unfortunately, if you have higher capacity Internet services the price of the corresponding MX is going to very quickly outpace the value you will get out of it. For example, I have a 1gig coax service at home, which would require an MX100 to properly use all the bandwidth. However, there's exactly zero chance that me and my wife could ever possible use 1gbps so I instead have an MX64 as that's much more in line with what we would actually use. 

 

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Re: Product selection question

I think i would choose mx67 over mx64.  More performance and the price is not that much difference?

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Re: Product selection question

I think MX67 didn't exist back when @jdsilva got his MX64, but I agree. MX67 may be the better choice.

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Re: Product selection question

Yes! Good call. I was neglecting the MX67. 

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Re: Product selection question

In a domestic situation, any MX device may not be suitable as ISPs in an increasing number of nations are switching to dynamic IPv6 addressing for home subscribers whilst continuing to offer multiplay (voice, internet, mobile, premium video content based on multicast IPTV) subscriptions.

 

MX appliances are not yet IPv6 ready and simply don't handle the most commonly encountered variety of multicast IPTV distribution, despite the Linux code being freely available.

 

I get round this situation by using a third party security appliance ahead of the MX and connecting the MX Internet port to one of the LAN ports on the other security appliance. This works, is not expensive (pick the right device), and helps keep the goats (smart TVs, A/V kit, IoT devices, the Guest WiFi, etc) away from the secure portion of the network.

 

In practice this approach is very efficient. Goats (Smart 4K TV monitors and A/V kit) are only attached to Sheep (secure workstations) using HDMI, which plug and plays.I prefer to keep old smart phones to control the Chromecast features which are built into most of the monitors and A/V systems.

 

We use a security model that is like an onion, interaction between the "skins" is strictly controlled. Overall, we have ended up with networks that are more resilient, flexible and secure than if we had relied upon a single security appliance.

Robin St.Clair | Principal, Caithness Analytics | @uberseehandel
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Re: Product selection question

Good point @Uberseehandel .

 

Here in Belgium our providers use a router-modem-combo to terminate the connections, so that isn't so much an issue. V4 or v6 doesn't matter anymore then.

 

My MX just has a private v4 IP on its WAN side and I have the MX defined as "DmZ host" in the provider router, which basically forwards all traffic to the MX. But this all depends on how the providers work I guess.

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