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Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Staff

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Conversationalist

Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Staff

I am new to the Meraki line of products and still learning about the Location Analytics as they relate to a the MR33 WAP we have - one per store location.

 

My main concern is that we have "noise" that I do not want included in location analytics. I am not sure if there is a way to "hide" it as opposed to just averaging it out over time.

 

For the record, our business (Shoe Retail) rarely has daily or weekly recurring customers/visitors that come in the store.

 

The noise I am referring to would be:

  1. Employees who have wireless devices regularly in our stores but do not connect/associate with our APs
  2. Employees/Staff of neighboring businesses (side-by-side or even below us in once case) that are at their own places of business most days. The argument could be made that these people are still potential customers. I am ok with that, but it would be nice to be able to filter them out.
    • I could probably reduce some of this noise by adjusting the radio/power settings for the AP, but this wouldn't be perfect and would likely sacrifice some performance on authorized, connected clients.

 

Ideally, I would want either:

  • Instructions on how to filter out all clients (by activity/status) that are essentially daily, non-associated clients
  • OR an explanation of how to exclude certain devices/MACs from analytics in a more manual fashion. This would be less dynamic, but my guess is that there may only be a dozen or two clients that are creating this noise at each location.

 

Thanks in advance if you made it this far. Any help or guidance (walk-thrus) would be very appreciated.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

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Meraki Employee

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Hi Russ,

The location analytics reports can't be modified at this level. I have two recommendations:
- Use the request a wish box on your Meraki dashboard for this kind of request.
- If you need something very specific for your business in terms of location analytics reports we have an ecosystem of development partners that can have what you need for your business. Here https://create.meraki.io/  you can find all the necessary information.

 

Hope this helps.

View solution in original post

12 REPLIES 12
Kind of a big deal

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Alas I don't think you can eliminate these using the Meraki provided solution.

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Conversationalist

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Thanks for the quick reply. Well why not 😉

 

It seems like it would be pretty handy for many of us. If I could filter a list of probing clients that show up almost every day with a certain signal strength, etc.... I could probably easily identify the "noise" and clean up my location analytics.

 

Oh well. I guess it will just come down to evaluating the values and differences over time. technical there should be similar noise all the time so there is still useful information.

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Meraki Employee

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Hi Russ,

The location analytics reports can't be modified at this level. I have two recommendations:
- Use the request a wish box on your Meraki dashboard for this kind of request.
- If you need something very specific for your business in terms of location analytics reports we have an ecosystem of development partners that can have what you need for your business. Here https://create.meraki.io/  you can find all the necessary information.

 

Hope this helps.

View solution in original post

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Here to help

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

hi Russ,

 

Meraki location analysis only shows at dashboard a few information, and you cannot modify or even analyse an specific user; Meraki use a MAC hash algorithm so it's not possible to track a user on dashboard. Although it, using API the Meraki developers can extract all info and correlate.

 

In this way, we're using an external captive portal + mktg + location analysis for one of our customers based on Purplewifi. But it's licensed on AP number, so if you have a few APs the cost may be affordable, but if you have a lot the total cost is rising. If you have 5 or less AP you can try the free-mode.

 

regards,

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Conversationalist

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Thank you, everyone.

 

fernando-bull (like the name and the movie). I am not sure how far we are going to take this, but where could I find out more info about that product. Is it just the Purple website you are referring to or is there a separate element?

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Here to help

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Hi Russ,

 

this captive portal license is ver good for: distributed installations with a lot of sites, and Meraki cloud AP infrastructure. It's focused to marketing and is created to capture all users data as they can. The insights derived from all data collected is awesome... if you show it to a mktg people, sure they'll want it.

 

i'm not a sales representative of Purple hahaha, but i think it's a good platform to capture user's data if this is the objective of your customer

 

please check https://purple.ai/

if you want to test the free license, a distributor near will contact you to activate it

 

regards,

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Getting noticed

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Hey Russ,

 

We use Purple as well for Location Analytics - although setting up is very particular.

You have the ability to set up exclusion zones so anyone detected in that region will not be counted in the reporting.

 

This works well for neighbouring sites, but ultimately depends on the accuracy of the location analytics, which takes a lot of fine tuning and correct positioning of the APs.

 

 

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New here

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

I think one has to learn how to deal with employs and other staff in office to organise them in a way they work hard and look for the betterment. If you feel you need some help, you can enjoy some movies on cyberflix tv.

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Here to help

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Russ, we also have a platform that excludes the zones and also identifies staff by dwell time and frequency of visit.

 

We show these on the dashboard as staff but exclude the data from heat maps and reporting as it skews the data.

 

Gary 

gary@limitlessinsight.com www.limitlessinsight.com

 

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New here

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

I have heard about Cyberflix apk for android phones and tabs. 

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New here

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Integrity

Integrity is the assurance that the information being accessed has not been altered and truly represents what is intended. Just as a person with integrity means what he or she says and can be trusted to consistently represent the truth, information integrity means information truly represents its intended meaning. Information can lose its integrity through malicious intent, such as when someone who is not authorized makes a change to intentionally misrepresent something. An example of this would be when a hacker is hired to go into the university’s system and change a grade.

Integrity can also be lost unintentionally, such as when a computer power surge corrupts a file or someone authorized to make a change accidentally deletes a file or enters incorrect information.

Availability

Information availability is the third part of the CIA triad. Availability means that information can be accessed and modified by anyone authorized to do so in an appropriate timeframe. Depending on the type of information, appropriate timeframe can mean different things. For example, a stock trader needs information to be available immediately, while a sales person may be happy to get sales numbers for the day in a report the next morning. Companies such as Amazon.com will require their servers to be available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Other companies may not suffer if their web servers are down for a few minutes once in a while.

Tools for Information Security

In order to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information, organizations can choose from a variety of tools. Each of these tools can be utilized as part of an overall information-security policy, which will be discussed in the next section.

Authentication

The most common way to identify someone is through their physical appearance, but how do we identify someone sitting behind a computer screen or at the ATM? Tools for authentication are used to ensure that the person accessing the information is, indeed, who they present themselves to be.

Authentication can be accomplished by identifying someone through one or more of three factors: something they know, something they have, or something they are. For example, the most common form of authentication today is the user ID and password. In this case, the authentication is done by confirming something that the user knows (their ID and password). But this form of authentication is easy to compromise (see sidebar) and stronger forms of authentication are sometimes needed. Identifying someone only by something they have, such as a key or a card, can also be problematic. When that identifying token is lost or stolen, the identity can be easily stolen. The final factor, something you are, is much harder to compromise. This factor identifies a user through the use of a physical characteristic, such as an eye-scan or fingerprint. Identifying someone through their physical characteristics is called biometrics.

A more secure way to authenticate a user is to do multi-factor authentication. By combining two or more of the factors listed above, it becomes much more difficult for someone to misrepresent themselves. An example of this would be the use of an RSA SecurID token. The RSA device is something you have, and will generate a new access code every sixty seconds. To log in to an information resource using the RSA device, you combine something you know, a four-digit PIN, with the code generated by the device. The only way to properly authenticate is by both knowing the code and having the RSA device.

Access Control

Once a user has been authenticated, the next step is to ensure that they can only access the information resources that are appropriate. This is done through the use of access control. Access control determines which users are authorized to read, modify, add, and/or delete information. Several different access control models exist. Here we will discuss two: the access control list (ACL) and role-based access control (RBAC).

For each information resource that an organization wishes to manage, a list of users who have the ability to take specific actions can be created. This is an access control list, or ACL. For each user, specific capabilities are assigned, such as read, write, delete, or add. Only users with those capabilities are allowed to perform those functions. If a user is not on the list, they have no ability to even know that the information resource exists.

ACLs are simple to understand and maintain. However, they have several drawbacks. The primary drawback is that each information resource is managed separately, so if a security administrator wanted to add or remove a user to a large set of information resources, it would be quite difficult. And as the number of users and resources increase, ACLs become harder to maintain. This has led to an improved method of access control, called role-based access control, or RBAC. With RBAC, instead of giving specific users access rights to an information resource, users are assigned to roles and then those roles are assigned the access. This allows the administrators to manage users and roles separately, simplifying administration and, by extension, improving security.

 

regards - ghd sports & gomaxtv

https://ghd-sports.com/ghd-sports-ios/
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Here to help

Re: Location Analytics Questions: Filtering Non-Associated Employees and/or Neighboring Business Sta

Russ we tag users as staff that remove them from the data & heatmaps.  We can also add filter for any member there for more than four hours or a member there for more than 3 days a week.  We build this into our analytics dashboard that I am happy to showcase. Built for Retail business. Gary +447801858809 Meraki Partner & Developer @LimitlessInsight

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