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Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) - MR45 - Slow speed

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Conversationalist

Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) - MR45 - Slow speed

I installed some MR45 on the network but the clients are connected to 802.11n (Channel 6 - 20 Mhz wide) or sometimes the AP changes the mode 802.11ax giving the highest speed to the user. How set to use only 802.11ax?

 

Thank you.

5 REPLIES 5
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Head in the Cloud

Re: Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) - MR45 - Slow speed

The question that is the bane of network admins everywhere who use WiFi. How do I make it fast? 

 

This is a huge multi-part question as there isn't a checkbox to make everything use 802.11ax. What devices are we talking about and are they even 802.11ax capable? What kind of interference do you have around these APs? What type of Radio Profiles are you using with your APs?

 

These are just a few of things that can affect WiFi performance. 

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Kind of a big deal

Re: Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) - MR45 - Slow speed

What clients are you using?
There is no way to make it 'ax' only the way your thinking. It has to be backwards compatible for legacy clients.
Nolan Herring | nolanwifi.com
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Kind of a big deal

Re: Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) - MR45 - Slow speed

You mention channel 6 - which is 2.4Ghz.  I would only using the 5Ghz band (under SSID settings).  Make sure you increase the minimum bit rate to at least 12Mb/s as well.

 

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Getting noticed

Re: Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) - MR45 - Slow speed

Just wondering (I'm always curious 🙂 😞 What's reason to deactivate 2.4 GHz? 802.11ax uses 2.4 too. Or is the reason to enforce clients not to connect to a 2.4 GHz network at all in case it's not a 802.11ax-capable client?
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Kind of a big deal

Re: Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) - MR45 - Slow speed

You are correct that 802.11ax is 2.4GHz as well, however, that band is usually known for being overcrowded and noisy, and has to deal with tons of interference from non-wifi sources (microwaves etc.).

So if you CAN avoid it, its usually best to do so. Of course, if the 2.4GHz environment at the location is clean, then its perfectly fine to use it of course.
Nolan Herring | nolanwifi.com
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