MR52 5ghz radiation pattern

SOLVED
RumorConsumer
Head in the Cloud

MR52 5ghz radiation pattern

Hello - I’m trying to make sense of the radiation pattern on the MR52. 

https://meraki.cisco.com/product-collateral/mr52-datasheet/?file

 

if you scroll all the way to the bottom in the 5ghz section you’ll see the figure in the bottom left shows a pattern with a measurement of 5 as the edge of the signal coming off the top of the unit. The second middle one is front to back and only goes to 0. Does this mean that if the MR52 were suspended in space I would get a further reaching signal if I were directly above it versus directly in front of its broad side?

Networking geek since high school where I got half of a CCNA. Played Marathon II and Infinity over localtalk.
Made many a network over the years, now de facto admin of a retreat center with some of this fine Meraki hardware.
Fortune 100 Tech veteran/refugee.
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Accepted Solutions
Bruce
Kind of a big deal

Re: MR52 5ghz radiation pattern

Yep, the Meraki wireless APs radiation patterns (for the internal antennas) are basically spherical - with a few small bumps here and there. Hence why you can happily mount them either on a ceiling, or on a wall, with very little difference (other than the obvious impact of the signal passing through the wall).

 

Compare this with the Cisco APs where they essentially create more of a blob/doughnut shape (okay, there are some exceptions) below the access point (assuming the AP is ceiling mounted). And hence why Cisco generally recommend not to wall mount the Cisco APs with internal antennas.

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3 REPLIES 3
Bruce
Kind of a big deal

Re: MR52 5ghz radiation pattern

Not sure where you are looking, but the markings on those radiation patterns are 10 at the edge of the radial, then 0, -10 and -20 moving back to the centre of the diagram. On the bottom left diagram the line goes right through the middle of the 0, so in that direction (90 degrees) the antenna gain is 0dB. In the middle diagram the gain at 90 degrees is about -1dB (or thereabouts). 

 

Your statement is correct regarding the signal being stronger above it, than directly in front of it if it was suspended in space in the same orientation as if it was wall mounted, but 1dB isn't going to make a huge difference. 

RumorConsumer
Head in the Cloud

Re: MR52 5ghz radiation pattern

That’s helpful. So to your reading it’s basically the same power in both directions - above and in front?

Networking geek since high school where I got half of a CCNA. Played Marathon II and Infinity over localtalk.
Made many a network over the years, now de facto admin of a retreat center with some of this fine Meraki hardware.
Fortune 100 Tech veteran/refugee.
Bruce
Kind of a big deal

Re: MR52 5ghz radiation pattern

Yep, the Meraki wireless APs radiation patterns (for the internal antennas) are basically spherical - with a few small bumps here and there. Hence why you can happily mount them either on a ceiling, or on a wall, with very little difference (other than the obvious impact of the signal passing through the wall).

 

Compare this with the Cisco APs where they essentially create more of a blob/doughnut shape (okay, there are some exceptions) below the access point (assuming the AP is ceiling mounted). And hence why Cisco generally recommend not to wall mount the Cisco APs with internal antennas.

View solution in original post

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